July 29, 2014
sassy-ass-cat:

okay THIS is my favorite so far

sassy-ass-cat:

okay THIS is my favorite so far

(via sgolitz)

July 29, 2014

(Source: spiritualinspiration, via sgolitz)

July 29, 2014
lacigreen:

englishistheartofbullshit:

submissivefeminist:

If you think this isn’t the damn truth you should know that a few years back, my campus newspaper ran an article that said fat women should be grateful for rape because it’s the only way they’ll ever feel worthy of a man’s attention.
I shit you not.

yeah, I’ve been told on multiple occasions during casual conversations that I’m not pretty/skinny enough to be raped, so that’s a thing

this disgusts the core of my being.

lacigreen:

englishistheartofbullshit:

submissivefeminist:

If you think this isn’t the damn truth you should know that a few years back, my campus newspaper ran an article that said fat women should be grateful for rape because it’s the only way they’ll ever feel worthy of a man’s attention.

I shit you not.

yeah, I’ve been told on multiple occasions during casual conversations that I’m not pretty/skinny enough to be raped, so that’s a thing

this disgusts the core of my being.

(Source: marfmellow, via sgolitz)

July 29, 2014

stereoculturesociety:

CultureSOUL: The Black Women of WWII  - Great Migration Era c. 1940s

  1. African American WAVES, U.S. Navy
  2. Maj. Charity E. Adams and Capt. Abbie N. Campbell inspect the first contingent of black members of the WAVES assigned to overseas service in WWII. Source: National Archives
  3. WWII, Black WAVES
  4. WWII women selling at War Bonds booth c. 1940s

(via sgolitz)

July 29, 2014
"Most Americans who made it past the fourth grade have a pretty good idea who Thurgood Marshall, Rosa Parks, and Martin Luther King, Jr., were. Not many Americans have even heard of Alice Paul, Howard W. Smith, and Martha Griffiths. But they played almost as big a role in the history of women’s rights as Marshall and King played in the history of civil rights for African-Americans. They gave women the handle to the door to economic opportunity, and nearly all the gains women have made in that sphere since the nineteen-sixties were made because of what they did."

Louis Menand on “The Sex Amendment: How women got in on the Civil Rights Act” in the New Yorker (via oupacademic)

July 28, 2014
bioe:

Things you Don’t need for weight loss.  #healthyliving #health #healthtip #healthyfood #diet #weighttraining #weightloss #obese #fat #fitness #fit #organic #organicliving #vegetables #vegan #vegetarian #gmofree #freshfoods #fruit #exercise #run #yoga #sweat #swim #cycling #food #foodporn

bioe:

Things you Don’t need for weight loss.
#healthyliving #health #healthtip #healthyfood #diet #weighttraining #weightloss #obese #fat #fitness #fit #organic #organicliving #vegetables #vegan #vegetarian #gmofree #freshfoods #fruit #exercise #run #yoga #sweat #swim #cycling #food #foodporn

July 28, 2014
"If you kill a person, you’re a murderer. If you steal, no one would hesitate to call you a thief. But in America, when you force yourself on someone sexually, some people will jump through flaming hoops not to call you a rapist."

— From my latest at the Guardian, When you call a rape anything but rape, you are just making excuses for rapists  (via lullabysounds)

(Source: jessicavalenti, via sgolitz)

July 27, 2014
pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 26, 1948: President Harry Truman Signs Executive Order 9981
On this day in 1948, President Truman issued an executive order abolishing racial segregation in all branches of the armed forces and establishing the President’s Committee on Equality of Treatment and Opportunity in the Armed Services. This major piece of legislation was a welcome victory for the African American soldiers’ “Double V” campaign, in which they fought both WWII abroad and racism at home.
Learn more about the importance of Truman’s order with a featured video from Tavis Smiley.
Photo: The Chicago Defender announces Executive Order 9981. Library of Congress Exhibition

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 26, 1948: President Harry Truman Signs Executive Order 9981

On this day in 1948, President Truman issued an executive order abolishing racial segregation in all branches of the armed forces and establishing the President’s Committee on Equality of Treatment and Opportunity in the Armed Services. This major piece of legislation was a welcome victory for the African American soldiers’ “Double V” campaign, in which they fought both WWII abroad and racism at home.

Learn more about the importance of Truman’s order with a featured video from Tavis Smiley.

Photo: The Chicago Defender announces Executive Order 9981. Library of Congress Exhibition

July 27, 2014
psychofactz:

More Facts on Psychofacts :)

psychofactz:

More Facts on Psychofacts :)

July 27, 2014

starwrangler said: Would it be fair enough to say that if travel was possible to get to whatever destination in question (by boat, land, whatever) then you can pretty much be sure that the population included people from many different places? (love your blog btw, I dig the work you're doing c: )

medievalpoc:

Well, here’s the thing. The basic premise of this whole deal is that what is or isn’t assumed to be “historically accurate” is used to exclude people of color from participating or being represented in historical and fantasy media of all kinds. Which is why the question from yesterday about white people being in Asia or Africa in “ancient times” is loaded. Because you cannot pretend that this works both ways equally.

What I am doing is trying to show that the same idea, being “historically accurate”, can be used to include people of color. Sadly, there is so much pressure to exclude, that people really feel the need to justify the presence of say, characters of color in a film, or a book, with some kind of historical facts and figures. Even when it’s ridiculously, almost comically, irrelevant-for example, people who seem to think that the history of Denmark has something to do with representation of characters of color in the Disney film Frozen.

What I hope is that by taking care of this end of things, creative types will have free rein to imagine whatever they want, to create what they envision without having to be bludgeoned with “not historically accurate!!!!” every time they turn around, whether or not it’s relevant to their creation.

The bottom line is, what we NEED is more films like Hercules, and fewer films like Exodus. What we see will trump what we KNOW every time-almost everyone knows and understand what The Silk Road was, yet the obvious facts that people traveled on it doesn’t come into play when someone starts insisting that “there were NO people of color in Medieval Europe!!!” Or Ancient Egypt. Or Classical Greece.

Because what we have here:

image

is a direct result of depictions like THIS:

image

more than anything historically accurate.

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